History Of 1996 Cricket World Cup squads

Teams

All the test playing countries participated in the competition including Zimbabwe who following the last world cup became the 9th Full Test status member of the ICC. The last Three Associate teams to qualify through the 1994 ICC Trophy also made their World Cup debuts in 1996: the United Arab Emirates, the Netherlands and Kenya. The Netherlands lost all of their five matches while the U.A.E. only beat the Dutch. Kenya, however, recorded a surprise victory over the West Indies in Pune.

Overview

The Sri Lankans, coached by Dav Whatmore and captained by Arjuna Ranatunga, used Man of the Series Sanath Jayasuriya[1] and Romesh Kaluwitharana as opening batsmen to take advantage of the fielding restrictions during the first 15 overs of each innings. At a time when 50 or 60 runs in the first 15 overs was considered adequate, Sri Lanka scored 117 runs in those overs against India, 123 against Kenya, 121 against England in the quarter-final and 86 against India in the semi-final. Against Kenya, Sri Lanka made 398 for 5, a new record for the highest team score in a One Day International that stood until April 2006. Gary Kirsten scored 188 not out against United Arab Emirates at Rawalpindi, Pakistan. This became the highest individual score ever in any World Cup match until it was surpassed by first Chris Gayle of the West Indies and later Martin Guptill who scored 215 and 237 respectively in the 2015 Cricket World Cup.

Sri Lanka won the first semi-final over India at Eden Gardens, Kolkata in front of a crowd unofficially estimated at 110 000. Chasing Sri Lanka’s innings of 251 for 8, India had slumped to 120 for 8 in the 35th over when sections of crowd began to throw fruit and plastic bottles onto the field. The players left the field for 20 minutes in an attempt to quieten the crowd. When the players returned for play, more bottles were thrown onto the field and fires were lit in the stand. Match refereeClive Lloyd awarded the match to Sri Lanka, the first default ever in a Test or One Day International (as of 2012, there has only been two defaults in a Test or One Day International).

In the second semi-final in Mohali, Australia recovered from 15 for 4 to reach 207 for 8 from their 50 overs. The West Indians had reached 165 for 2 in the 42nd over before losing their last 8 wickets for 37 runs in 50 balls.

Sri Lanka won the toss in the final and sent Australia in to bat despite the team batting first having won all five previous World Cup finals. Mark Taylor top scored with 74 in Australia’s total of 241 for 7. Sri Lanka won the match in the 47th over with Aravinda de Silva following his 3 for 42 with an unbeaten 107 to win the Player of the Match award. It was the first time a tournament host or co-host had won the cricket World Cup.

Group stage

Group A

Team Pld Pts W L NR T NRR
 Sri Lanka 5 10 5 0 0 0 1.60
 Australia 5 6 3 2 0 0 0.90
 India 5 6 3 2 0 0 0.45
 West Indies 5 4 2 3 0 0 −0.13
 Zimbabwe 5 2 1 4 0 0 −0.93
 Kenya 5 2 1 4 0 0 −1.00
16 February
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
151/9 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
155/4 (29.3 overs)
Grant Flower 31 (54)
Curtley Ambrose 3/28 (10 overs)
Sherwin Campbell 47 (88)
Paul Strang 4/40 (7.3 overs)
West Indies won by 6 wickets
Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium, Hyderabad
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Curtley Ambrose (WI)

17 February
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
v
 Australia
Sri Lanka won by a walkover
R Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Cyril Mitchley
  • Australia forfeited the match due to safety concerns, and were in Bombay at the time of the match.

18 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
199/6 (50 overs)
v
 India
203/3 (41.5 overs)
Steve Tikolo 65 (83)
Anil Kumble 3/28 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 127* (138)
Steve Tikolo 1/26 (3 overs)
India won by 7 wickets
Barabati Stadium, Cuttack
Umpires: K. T. Francis and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar (Ind)

21 February
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
228/6 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
229/4 (37 overs)
Alistair Campbell 75 (102)
Chaminda Vaas 2/30 (10 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 91 (86)
Heath Streak 3/60 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets
Sinhalese Sports Club Ground, Colombo
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Mahboob Shah
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)

21 February
Scorecard
West Indies 
173 (50 overs)
v
 India
174/5 (39.4 overs)
Richie Richardson 47 (70)
Anil Kumble 3/35 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 70 (91)
Roger Harper 2/34 (9 overs)
India won by 5 wickets
Captain Roop Singh Stadium, Gwalior
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar (Ind)

23 February
Scorecard
Australia 
304/7 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
207/7 (50 overs)
Mark Waugh 130 (128)
Rajab Ali 3/45 (10 overs)
Kennedy Otieno 85 (137)
Paul Reiffel 2/18 (7 overs)
Australia won by 97 runs
Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Visakhapatnam
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)

26 February
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
v
 West Indies
Sri Lanka won by a walkover
Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and V.K. Ramaswamy
  • West Indies forfeited the match due to safety concerns.

26 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
134 (49.4 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
137/5 (42.2 overs)
Dipak Chudasama 34 (66)
Paul Strang 5/21 (9.4 overs)
Grant Flower 45 (112)
Rajab Ali 3/22 (8 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 5 wickets
Moin-ul-Haq Stadium, Patna
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Paul Strang (Zim)
  • This game was scheduled to be played on 25 February. That game started but was abandoned after 15.5 overs in the Zimbabwe innings.

27 February
Scorecard
Australia 
258 (50 overs)
v
 India
242 (48 overs)
Mark Waugh 126 (135)
Venkatapathy Raju 2/48 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 90 (84)
Damien Fleming 5/36 (9 overs)
Australia won by 16 runs
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Umpires: Steve Dunne and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)

29 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
166 (49.3 overs)
v
 West Indies
93 (35.2 overs)
Steve Tikolo 29 (50)
Courtney Walsh 3/46 (9 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 19 (48)
Maurice Odumbe 3/15 (10 overs)
Kenya won by 73 runs
Nehru Stadium, Pune
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Maurice Odumbe (Ken)

1 March
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
154 all out (45.3 overs)
v
 Australia
158/2 (36 overs)
Andy Waller 67 (101)
Shane Warne 4/34 (9.3 overs)
Mark Waugh 76* (109)
Paul Strang 2/33 (10 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
Vidarbha Cricket Association Ground, Nagpur
Umpires: Steve Dunne and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)

2 March
Scorecard
India 
271/3 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
272/4 (48.4 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 137 (137)
Ravindra Pushpakumara 1/53 (8 overs)
Sanath Jayasuriya 79 (76)
Anil Kumble 2/39 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets
Feroz Shah Kotla, Delhi
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sanath Jayasuriya (SL)

4 March
Scorecard
Australia 
229/6 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
232/6 (48.5 overs)
Ricky Ponting 102 (112)
Courtney Walsh 2/35 (9 overs)
Richie Richardson 93* (133)
Mark Waugh 3/38 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 4 wickets
Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Richie Richardson (WI)

6 March
Scorecard
India 
247/5 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
207 all out (49.4 overs)
Vinod Kambli 106 (110)
Charlie Lock 2/57 (10 overs)
Heath Streak 30 (39)
Venkatapathy Raju 3/30 (10 overs)
India won by 40 runs
Green Park, Kanpur
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Ajay Jadeja (Ind)

6 March
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
398/5 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
254/7 (50 overs)
Aravinda De Silva 145 (115)
Tito Odumbe 2/34 (5 overs)
Steve Tikolo 96 (95)
Arjuna Ranatunga 2/31 (5 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 144 runs
Asgiriya Stadium, Kandy
Umpires: Steve Dunne and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Aravinda De Silva (SL)
  • Sri Lanka’s total of 398/5 surpassed England’s 363/7 against Pakistan in 1992 as the highest score in all ODIs. The record stood until 12 March 2006, when both Australia and South Africa broke it in the same match. It remained a World Cup record until the 2007 tournament, when India scored 413/5 against Bermuda.[2]

Group B

Team Pts Pld W L NR T NRR
 South Africa 10 5 5 0 0 0 2.04
 Pakistan 8 5 4 1 0 0 0.96
 New Zealand 6 5 3 2 0 0 0.55
 England 4 5 2 3 0 0 0.08
 United Arab Emirates 2 5 1 4 0 0 −1.83
 Netherlands 0 5 0 5 0 0 −1.92
14 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
239/6 (50 overs)
v
 England
228/9 (50 overs)
Nathan Astle 101 (132)
Graeme Hick 2/45 (9 overs)
Graeme Hick 85 (102)
Dion Nash 3/26 (7 overs)
New Zealand won by 11 runs
Gujarat Stadium, Motera, Ahmedabad
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Nathan Astle (NZ)

16 February
Scorecard
South Africa 
321/2 (50 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
152/8 (50 overs)
Gary Kirsten 188* (159)
Johanne Samarasekera 1/39 (9 overs)
Arshad Laeeq 43 (79)
Brian McMillan 3/11 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 169 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Gary Kirsten (SA)

17 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
307/8 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
188/7 (50 overs)
Craig Spearman 68 (59)
Steven Lubbers 3/48 (9 overs)
Roland Lefebvre 45 (64)
Chris Harris 3/24 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 119 runs
Moti Bagh Stadium, Baroda
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Craig Spearman (NZ)

18 February
Scorecard
United Arab Emirates 
136 (48.3 overs)
v
 England
140/2 (35 overs)
Mazhar Hussain 33 (59)
Neil Smith 3/29
Graham Thorpe 44* (66)
Arshad Laeeq 1/25 (7 overs)
England won by 8 wickets
Arbab Niaz Stadium, Peshawar
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Neil Smith (Eng)

20 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
177/9 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
178/5 (37.3 overs)
Stephen Fleming 33 (79)
Allan Donald 3/34 (10 overs)
Hansie Cronje 78 (64)
Nathan Astle 2/10 (3 overs)
South Africa won by 5 wickets
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Umpires: Steve Randell and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Hansie Cronje (SA)

22 February
Scorecard
England 
279/4 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
230/6 (50 overs)
Graeme Hick 104* (133)
Roland Lefebvre 1/40 (10 overs)
Klaas van Noortwijk 64 (82)
Phil DeFreitas 3/31 (10 overs)
England won by 49 runs
Arbab Niaz Stadium, Peshawar
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and K.T. Francis
Player of the match: Graeme Hick (Eng)

24 February
Scorecard
United Arab Emirates 
109/9 (33 overs)
v
 Pakistan
112/1 (18 overs)
Shaukat Dukanwala 21* (19)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/16 (7 overs)
Ijaz Ahmed 50* (57)
Johanne Samarasekera 1/17 (3 overs)
Pakistan won by 9 wickets
Jinnah Stadium, Gujranwala
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Mushtaq Ahmed (Pak)

25 February
Scorecard
South Africa 
230 all out (50 overs)
v
 England
152 all out (44.3 overs)
Gary Kirsten 38 (60)
Peter Martin 3/33 (10 overs)
Graham Thorpe 46 (69)
Shaun Pollock 2/16 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 78 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Steve Randell and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Jonty Rhodes (SA)

26 February
Scorecard
Netherlands 
145/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
151/2 (30.4 overs)
Flavian Aponso 58
Waqar Younis 4/26
Saeed Anwar 83*
Peter Cantrell 1/18 (4 overs)
Pakistan won by 8 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Waqar Younis (Pak)

27 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
276/8 (47 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
167/9 (47 overs)
Roger Twose 92 (112)
Azhar Saeed 3/45 (7 overs)
Johanne Samarasekera 47 (59)
Shane Thomson 3/20
New Zealand won by 109 runs
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Roger Twose (NZ)
  • Match reduced to 47 overs a side due to heavy fog at the start of the match.

29 February
Scorecard
Pakistan 
242/6 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
243/5 (44.2 overs)
Aamir Sohail 111 (139)
Hansie Cronje 2/20 (5 overs)
Daryll Cullinan 65 (76)
Waqar Younis 3/50 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 5 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Hansie Cronje (SA)
  • Bucknor replaced Ian Robinson as an umpire in this match after protests by Pakistan.

1 March
Scorecard
Netherlands 
216/9 (50 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
220/3 (44.2 overs)
Peter Cantrell 47 (106)
Shaukat Dukanwala 5/29 (10 overs)
Saleem Raza 84 (68)
Roland Lefebvre 1/24 (8 overs)
United Arab Emirates won by 7 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Shaukat Dukanwala (UAE)
  • This was the first ever official ODI between two ICC Associate teams.

3 March
Scorecard
England 
249/9 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
250/3 (47.4 overs)
Robin Smith 75 (92)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/53 (10 overs)
Saeed Anwar 71 (72)
Dominic Cork 2/59 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Aamer Sohail (Pak)

5 March
Scorecard
South Africa 
328/3 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
168/8 (50 overs)
Andrew Hudson 161 (132)
Eric Gouka 1/32 (2 overs)
Nolan Clarke 32 (46)
Allan Donald 2/21 (6 overs)
South Africa won by 160 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Andrew Hudson (SA)

6 March
Scorecard
Pakistan 
281/5 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
235 (47.3 overs)
Saeed Anwar 62 (67)
Robert Kennedy 1/32 (5 overs)
Stephen Fleming 42 (43)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/32 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 46 runs
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Saleem Malik (Pak)

Knockout stage

Main article: 1996 Cricket World Cup knockout stage
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
9 March – Faisalabad, Pakistan
  England  235/8
13 March – Calcutta, India
  Sri Lanka  236/5
  Sri Lanka  251/8
9 March – Bangalore, India
  India  120/8
  India  287/8
17 March – Lahore, Pakistan
  Pakistan  248/9
  Sri Lanka  245/3
11 March – Karachi, Pakistan
  Australia  241/7
  West Indies  264/8
14 March – Mohali, India
  South Africa  245
  West Indies  202
11 March – Chennai, India
  Australia  207/8
  New Zealand  286/9
  Australia  289/4

Quarter-finals

9 March
Scorecard
England 
235/8 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
236/5 (40.4 overs)
Phil DeFreitas 67 (64)
Kumar Dharmasena 2/30 (10 overs)
Sanath Jayasuriya 82 (44)
Dermot Reeve 1/14 (4 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 5 wickets
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Attendance: 25,000
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sanath Jayasuriya (SL)

9 March
Scorecard
India 
287/8 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
248/9 (49 overs)
Navjot Sidhu 93 (115)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/56 (10 overs)
Aamer Sohail 55 (46)
Venkatesh Prasad 3/45 (10 overs)
India won by 39 runs
M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
Attendance: 55,000
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Navjot Sidhu (Ind)
  • Pakistan was fined 1 over for a slow over rate

11 March
Scorecard
West Indies 
264/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
245 (49.3 overs)
Brian Lara 111 (94)
Brian McMillan 2/37 (10 overs)
Daryll Cullinan 69 (78)
Roger Harper 4/47 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 19 runs
National Stadium, Karachi
Attendance: 30,666
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Brian Lara (WI)

11 March
Scorecard
New Zealand 
286/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
289/4 (47.5 overs)
Chris Harris 130 (124)
Glenn McGrath 2/50 (9 overs)
Mark Waugh 110 (112)
Nathan Astle 1/21 (3 overs)
Australia won by 6 wickets
MA Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai
Attendance: 48,273
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)

Semi-finals

13 March
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
251/8 (50 overs)
v
 India
120/8 (34.1 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 66 (47)
Javagal Srinath 3/34 (7 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 65 (88)
Sanath Jayasuriya 3/12 (7 overs)
Match awarded to Sri Lanka
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
Attendance: 110,000
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)
  • The match was awarded to Sri Lanka by match referee Clive Lloyd when play could not be continued due to the rioting crowd.

14 March
Scorecard
Australia 
207/8 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
202 all out (49.3 overs)
Stuart Law 72 (105)
Curtly Ambrose 2/26 (10 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 80 (126)
Shane Warne 4/36 (9 overs)
Australia won by 5 runs
Punjab C.A. Stadium, Mohali
Attendance: 34,973
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and S Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)

Final

Main article: 1996 Cricket World Cup Final
17 March
Scorecard
Australia 
241/7 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
245/3 (46.2 overs)
Mark Taylor 74 (83)
Aravinda de Silva 3/42 (9 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 107 (124)
Damien Fleming 1/43 (6 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Attendance: 62,645
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)

Sri Lanka won the toss and chose to field. Mark Taylor (74 from 83 balls, 8 fours, 1 six) and Ricky Ponting (45 from 73 balls, 2 fours) shared a second-wicket partnership of 101 runs. When Ponting and Taylor were dismissed, however, Australia fell from 1/137 to 5/170 as the famed 4-pronged spin attack of Sri Lanka took its toll. Despite the slump, Australia struggled on to 241 (7 wickets, 50 overs).

Statistics

Main article: 1996 Cricket World Cup statistics

Sachin Tendulkar, the leading run scorer in the tournament.

Anil Kumble, the leading wicket taker in the tournament.

Leading run scorers
Runs Player Country
523 Sachin Tendulkar  India
484 Mark Waugh  Australia
448 Aravinda de Silva  Sri Lanka
391 Gary Kirsten  South Africa
329 Saeed Anwar  Pakistan
Leading wicket takers
Wickets Player Country
15 Anil Kumble  India
13 Waqar Younis  Pakistan
12
Paul Strang  Zimbabwe
Roger Harper  West Indies
Damien Fleming  Australia
Shane Warne  Australia

1992 Cricket World Cup History

Firsts

The 1992 World Cup was the first to feature coloured player clothing, white cricket balls and black sightscreens with a number of matches being played under floodlights.[1] These innovations had been increasingly used in One Day Internationals since World Series Cricket introduced them in the late 1970s, but they were not a feature of previous World Cups. The 1992 World Cup was also the first to be held in the Southern hemisphere. It was also the first World Cup to include the South Africa national cricket team, which had been allowed to re-join the International Cricket Council as a Test-playing nation after the end of apartheid.

Format

The format was changed from previous tournaments in that a complete round-robin replaced the use of two qualifying groups. The initial draw was released with eight competing countries and 28 round-robin matches. In late 1991, South Africa were re-admitted to the International Cricket Council after long years of apartheid and the draw was amended to include them. The revised draw included 36 round-robin matches plus the two semi-finals and the final.

The rule for calculating the target score for the team batting second in rain-affected matches was also changed. The previous rule simply multiplied the run rate of the team batting first by the number of overs available to the team batting second. This rule was deemed to be too much in favour of the team batting second. In an attempt to rectify this, the target score would now be calculated by the “highest scoring overs” formula.

In this system, if the team batting second had 44 overs available, their target score would be one greater than the 44 highest scoring overs of the team batting first. While the reasoning behind the system was sound, the timing of rain interruptions remained problematic: as the semi-final between England and South Africa demonstrated, where a difficult but eminently reachable 22 runs off 13 balls was reduced to 22 off 7 (the least productive over, a maiden, being deducted) and finally 21 off 1 ball (the next least productive over having given 1 run). It was seen that, if the interruption came during the second innings, the side batting second was at a significant disadvantage – one which was only overcome once, in fact, inEngland’s group-stage victory over South Africa.

Teams

The 1992 World Cup featured the seven Test teams of the day, and for the first time South Africa, who would play their first Test in 22 years in the West Indies a month after the World Cup, and Zimbabwe who for the third time qualified by winning the 1990 ICC Trophy and would play their first Test match later in 1992. Teams who entered were:[2]

  •  Australia (winners of the 1987 Cricket World Cup and eventual winners of the 1999 Cricket World Cup, 2003 Cricket World Cup, 2007 Cricket World Cup)
  •  England
  •  India (winners of the 1983 Cricket World Cup and eventual winners of the 2011 Cricket World Cup)
  •  New Zealand
  •  Pakistan (winners of the 1992 Cricket World Cup)
  •  South Africa
  •  Sri Lanka (eventual winners of the 1996 Cricket World Cup)
  •  West Indies (winners of the 1975 Cricket World Cup and 1979 Cricket World Cup)
  •  Zimbabwe

Venues

Australia

Perth
Perth
Melbourne
Melbourne
Sydney
Sydney
Hobart
Hobart
Mackay
Mackay
Brisbane
Brisbane
Adelaide
Adelaide
Ballarat
Ballarat
Canberra
Canberra
Berri
Berri
Albury
Albury

Venues in Australia

Venue City Matches
Adelaide Oval Adelaide, South Australia 3
Lavington Sports Oval Albury, New South Wales 1
Eastern Oval Ballarat, Victoria 1
Berri Oval Berri, South Australia 1
The Gabba Brisbane, Queensland 3
Manuka Oval Canberra, ACT 1
Bellerive Oval Hobart, Tasmania 2
Ray Mitchell Oval Mackay, Queensland 1
Melbourne Cricket Ground Melbourne 5
WACA Ground Perth, Western Australia 3
Sydney Cricket Ground Sydney 4

New Zealand

Auckland
Auckland
Christchurch
Christchurch
Dunedin
Dunedin
Hamilton
Hamilton
Napier
Napier
New Plymouth
New Plymouth
Wellington
Wellington

Venues in New Zealand

Venue City Matches
Eden Park Auckland, Auckland 4
Lancaster Park Christchurch, Canterbury 2
Carisbrook Dunedin, Otago 1
Trust Bank Park Hamilton, Waikato 2
McLean Park Napier, Hawke’s Bay 1
Pukekura Park New Plymouth, Taranaki 1
Basin Reserve Wellington, Wellington 3

Officials

Umpires

Eleven umpires were selected to officiate at the World Cup: two from each of the host nations, Australia and New Zealand, and one from each of the other participating nations.

West Indies’ Steve Bucknor and England’s David Shepherd were chosen as the umpires for the first semi-final,[3] while New Zealand’s Brian Aldridge and Australia’s Steve Randell were chosen for the second.[4] Bucknor and Aldridge were chosen for the final.[5]

S.No. Umpire Country Matches
1 Steve Bucknor  West Indies 9
2 Brian Aldridge  New Zealand 9
3 David Shepherd  England 8
4 Steve Randell  Australia 8
5 Khizer Hayat  Pakistan 7
6 Piloo Reporter  India 7
7 Dooland Buultjens  Sri Lanka 6
8 Peter McConnell  Australia 6
9 Steve Woodward  New Zealand 6
10 Ian Robinson  Zimbabwe 6
11 Karl Liebenberg  South Africa 6

Referees

Two referees were also selected to supervise the semi-finals and final. Australia’s Peter Burge supervised the first semi-final and the final,[3][5] while New Zealand’s Frank Cameron supervised the second semi-final.[4]

Referee Country Matches 1992 WC
Peter Burge  Australia 63 2
Frank Cameron  New Zealand 5 1

Squads

Main article: 1992 Cricket World Cup squads

Tournament progression

Round-robin stage Knockout
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SF F
 Australia 0 0 2 2 4 4 6 8
 England 2 4 5 7 9 11 11 11 W L
 India 0 1 1 3 5 5 5 5
 New Zealand 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 14 L
 Pakistan 0 2 3 3 3 5 7 9 W W
 South Africa 2 2 2 4 6 8 8 10 L
 Sri Lanka 2 2 3 5 5 5 5 5
 West Indies 2 2 4 4 4 6 8 8
 Zimbabwe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Win Loss No result
Note: The total points at the end of each group match are listed.
Note: Click on the points (group matches) or W/L (knockout) to see the match summary.

Round – Robin Stage

Main article: 1992 Cricket World Cup round-robin stage

Co-hosts New Zealand proved the surprise packet of the tournament, winning their first seven games to finish on top of the table after the round-robin. The other hosts, Australia, one of the pre-tournament favourites lost their first two matches. They recovered somewhat to win four of the remaining six, but narrowly missed out on the semi-finals. The West Indiesalso finished with a 4–4 record, but were just behind Australia on run-rate. South Africa made a triumphant return to international cricket with a win over Australia at the SCG in their first match. They and England had solid campaigns and easily qualified for the semis, despite upset losses to Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe respectively. India had a disappointing tournament and never looked likely to progress beyond the round-robin. Sri Lanka were still establishing themselves at the highest level and beat only Zimbabwe (who did not yet have Test status) and South Africa.

New Zealand were defeated only twice in the tournament, both times by Pakistan, in their final group match and in the semi-final. Pakistan had been lucky to be in the semi-finals at all: following only one victory in their first five matches, they were also fortunate to scrape a point from the washed-out match against England which appeared to be heading for a heavy English victory (Pak 74 all out, Eng 24/1): eventually they finished one point ahead of Australia with an inferior run-rate.

Points table

Team Pts Pld W L NR T RD RR
 New Zealand 14 8 7 1 0 0 0.59 4.76
 England 11 8 5 2 1 0 0.47 4.36
 South Africa 10 8 5 3 0 0 0.14 4.36
 Pakistan 9 8 4 3 1 0 0.17 4.33
 Australia 8 8 4 4 0 0 0.20 4.22
 West Indies 8 8 4 4 0 0 0.07 4.14
 India 5 8 2 5 1 0 0.14 4.95
 Sri Lanka 5 8 2 5 1 0 −0.68 4.21
 Zimbabwe 2 8 1 7 0 0 −1.14 4.03

Match scores

22 February 1992
Scorecard
New Zealand 
248/6 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
211 (48.1 overs)
Martin Crowe 100* (134)
Craig McDermott 2/43 (10 overs)
David Boon 100 (133)
Gavin Larsen 3/30 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 37 runs
Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
Attendance: 30,000
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Martin Crowe
22 February 1992
Scorecard
England 
236/9 (50 overs)
v
 India
227 (49.2 overs)
Robin Smith 91 (108)
Manoj Prabhakar 2/34 (10 overs)
Ravi Shastri 57 (112)
Dermot Reeve 3/38 (6 overs)
England won by 9 runs
WACA Ground, Perth, Australia
Umpires: Dooland Buultjens and Peter McConnell
Player of the match: Ian Botham
23 February 1992
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
312/4 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
313/7 (49.2 overs)
Andy Flower 115* (152)
Pramodya Wickramasinghe 2/50 (10 overs)
Arjuna Ranatunga 88* (61)
Eddo Brandes 3/70 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets
Pukekura Park, New Plymouth, New Zealand
Umpires: Piloo Reporter and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Andy Flower
23 February 1992
Scorecard
Pakistan 
220/2 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
221/0 (46.5 overs)
Rameez Raja 102* (158)
Roger Harper 1/33 (10 overs)
Desmond Haynes 93* (144)
Wasim Akram 0/37 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 10 wickets
Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
Umpires: Steve Randell and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Brian Lara
25 February 1992
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
206/9 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
210/4 (48.2 overs)
Roshan Mahanama 80 (131)
Willie Watson 3/37 (10 overs)
Ken Rutherford 65* (71)
Ruwan Kalpage 2/33 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets
Trust Bank Park, Hamilton, New Zealand
Umpires: Piloo Reporter and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Ken Rutherford
26 February 1992
Scorecard
Australia 
170/9 (49 overs)
v
 South Africa
171/1 (46.5 overs)
David Boon 27 (31)
Allan Donald 3/34 (10 overs)
Kepler Wessels 81* (148)
Peter Taylor 1/32 (10 overs)
South Africa won by 9 wickets
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Kepler Wessels
27 February 1992
Scorecard
Pakistan 
254/4 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
201/7 (50 overs)
Aamir Sohail 114 (136)
Iain Butchart 3/57 (10 overs)
Andy Waller 44 (36)
Wasim Akram 3/21 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 53 runs
Bellerive Oval, Hobart, Australia
Umpires: Dooland Buultjens and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Aamir Sohail
27 February 1992
Scorecard
West Indies 
157 (49.2 overs)
v
 England
160/4 (39.5 overs)
Keith Arthurton 54 (101)
Chris Lewis 3/30 (8.2 overs)
Graham Gooch 65 (101)
Winston Benjamin 2/22 (9.5 overs)
England won by 6 wickets
Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Chris Lewis
28 February 1992
Scorecard
India 
1/0 (0.2 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
No result
Ray Mitchell Oval, Mackay, Australia
Umpires: Ian Robinson and David Shepherd
  • The match was initially reduced to 20 overs a side due to rain. A helicopter was used to dry the pitch but as play began rain fell again, washing out the game.
29 February 1992
Scorecard
South Africa 
190/7 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
191/3 (34.3 overs)
Peter Kirsten 90 (129)
Willie Watson 2/30 (10 overs)
Mark Greatbatch 68 (60)
Peter Kirsten 1/22 (7 overs)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets
Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Piloo Reporter
Player of the match: Mark Greatbatch
29 February 1992
Scorecard
West Indies 
264/8 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
189/7 (50 overs)
Brian Lara 72 (71)
Eddo Brandes 3/45 (10 overs)
Ali Shah 60* (87)
Winston Benjamin 3/27 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 75 runs
Brisbane Cricket Ground, Brisbane, Australia
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Brian Lara
1 March 1992
Scorecard
Australia 
237/9 (50 overs)
v
 India
234 (47 overs)
Dean Jones 90 (108)
Kapil Dev 3/41 (10 overs)
Mohammed Azharuddin 93 (102)
Tom Moody 3/56 (9 overs)
Australia won by 1 run (revised target)
Brisbane Cricket Ground, Brisbane, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Dean Jones
  • Rain interrupted play after 16.2 overs in the Indian innings (45/1). India’s target recalculated to 236 off 47 overs.
1 March 1992
Scorecard
Pakistan 
74 (40.2 overs)
v
 England
24/1 (8 overs)
Saleem Malik 17 (20)
Derek Pringle 3/8 (8.2 overs)
Ian Botham 6* (22)
Wasim Akram 1/7 (3 overs)
No result
Adelaide Oval, Adelaide, Australia
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Peter McConnell
2 March 1992
Scorecard
South Africa 
195 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
198/7 (49.5 overs)
Peter Kirsten 47 (81)
Don Anurasiri 3/41 (10 overs)
Roshan Mahanama 68 (121)
Allan Donald 3/42 (9.5 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets
Basin Reserve, Wellington, New Zealand
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Arjuna Ranatunga
3 March 1992
Scorecard
New Zealand 
162/3 (20.5 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
105/7 (18 overs)
Martin Crowe 74* (43)
Kevin Duers 1/17 (6 overs)
Andy Flower 30 (28)
Chris Harris 3/15 (4 overs)
New Zealand won by 48 runs (revised target)
McLean Park, Napier, New Zealand
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Dooland Buultjens
Player of the match: Martin Crowe
  • New Zealand innings interrupted at 9/1 (2.1 overs). Match reduced to 35 overs per side. Further interruption at 52/2 (11.2 ov). Match reduced to 24 overs per side. Innings ended by a third interruption after 20.5 overs. Zimbabwe set a target of 154 from 18 overs.
4 March 1992
Scorecard
India 
216/7 (49 overs)
v
 Pakistan
173 (48.1 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 54* (62)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/59 (10 overs)
Aamir Sohail 62 (95)
Manoj Prabhakar 2/22 (10 overs)
India won by 43 runs
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney, Australia
Umpires: Peter McConnell and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar
  • Match reduced to 49 overs per side due to a slow over rate by Pakistan.
5 March 1992
Scorecard
South Africa 
200/8 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
136 (38.4 overs)
Peter Kirsten 56 (91)
Malcolm Marshall 2/26 (10 overs)
Gus Logie 61 (69)
Meyrick Pringle 4/11 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 64 runs
Lancaster Park, Christchurch, New Zealand
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Meyrick Pringle
5 March 1992
Scorecard
Australia 
171 (49 overs)
v
 England
173/2 (40.5 overs)
Tom Moody 51 (88)
Ian Botham 4/31 (10 overs)
Graham Gooch 58 (112)
Mike Whitney 1/28 (10 overs)
England won by 8 wickets
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney, Australia
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Khizer Hayat
Player of the match: Ian Botham
7 March 1992
Scorecard
India 
203/7 (32 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
104/1 (19.1 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 81 (88)
John Traicos 3/35 (6 overs)
Andy Flower 43 (56)
Sachin Tendulkar 1/35 (6 overs)
India won by 55 runs (revised target)
Trust Bank Park, Hamilton, New Zealand
Umpires: Dooland Buultjens and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar
  • After rain forced the early close of the Indian innings, the target was recalculated to 159 runs in the 19 overs.
7 March 1992
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
189/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
190/3 (44 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 62 (83)
Peter Taylor 2/34 (10 overs)
Geoff Marsh 60 (113)
Pramodya Wickramasinghe 2/29 (10 overs)
Australia won by 7 wickets
Adelaide Oval, Adelaide, Australia
Umpires: Piloo Reporter and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Tom Moody

8 March 1992
Scorecard
West Indies 
203/7 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
206/5 (48.3 overs)
Brian Lara 52 (81)
Gavin Larsen 2/41 (10 overs)
Martin Crowe 81* (81)
Winston Benjamin 2/34 (9.3 overs)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets
Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Peter McConnell
Player of the match: Martin Crowe

8 March 1992
Scorecard
South Africa 
211/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
173/8 (36 overs)
Andrew Hudson 54 (77)
Imran Khan 2/34 (10 overs)
Inzamam-ul-Haq 48 (44)
Adrian Kuiper 3/40 (6 overs)
South Africa won by 20 runs (revised target)
Brisbane Cricket Ground, Brisbane, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Andrew Hudson
  • When Pakistan was 74/2 after 21.3 overs, rain halted the play for an hour and the target was revised to 194 in 36 overs.

9 March 1992
Scorecard
England 
280/9 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
174 (44 overs)
Neil Fairbrother 63 (70)
Asanka Gurusinha 2/67 (10 overs)
Arjuna Ranatunga 36 (51)
Chris Lewis 4/30 (8 overs)
England won by 106 runs
Eastern Oval, Ballarat, Australia
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Piloo Reporter
Player of the match: Chris Lewis
10 March 1992
Scorecard
India 
197 (49.4 overs)
v
 West Indies
195/5 (44 overs)
Mohammed Azharuddin 61 (84)
Anderson Cummins 4/33 (10 overs)
Keith Arthurton 58 (99)
Javagal Srinath 2/23 (9 overs)
West Indies won by 5 wickets (revised target)
Basin Reserve, Wellington, New Zealand
Umpires: Steve Randell and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Anderson Cummins
10 March 1992
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
163 (48.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
164/3 (45.1 overs)
Eddo Brandes 20 (28)
Peter Kirsten 3/51 (5 overs)
Kepler Wessels 70 (137)
Malcolm Jarvis 1/23 (9 overs)
South Africa won by 7 wickets
Manuka Oval, Canberra, Australia
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Peter Kirsten
11 March 1992
Scorecard
Pakistan 
220/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
172 (45.2 overs)
Aamir Sohail 76 (104)
Steve Waugh 3/36 (10 overs)
Dean Jones 47 (79)
Aaqib Javed 3/21 (8 overs)
Pakistan won by 48 runs
WACA Ground, Perth, Australia
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Piloo Reporter
Player of the match: Aamir Sohail
12 March 1992
Scorecard
India 
230/6 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
231/6 (47.1 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 84 (107)
Chris Harris 3/55 (9 overs)
Mark Greatbatch 73 (77)
Manoj Prabhakar 3/46 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets
Carisbrook, Dunedin, New Zealand
Umpires: Peter McConnell and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Mark Greatbatch
12 March 1992
Scorecard
South Africa 
236/4 (50 overs)
v
 England
226/7 (40.5 overs)
Kepler Wessels 85 (126)
Graeme Hick 2/44 (8.2 overs)
Alec Stewart 77 (88)
Richard Snell 3/42 (7.5 overs)
England won by 3 wickets (revised target)
Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Dooland Buultjens
Player of the match: Alec Stewart
  • Rain disrupted play in England’s innings for 43 minutes when they were 62/0 after 12.0 overs. The target was revised to 226 in 41 overs.
13 March 1992
Scorecard
West Indies 
268/8 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
177/9 (50 overs)
Phil Simmons 110 (125)
Chandika Hathurusinghe 4/57 (8 overs)
Athula Samarasekera 40 (41)
Carl Hooper 2/19 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 91 runs
Berri Oval, Berri, Australia
Umpires: David Shepherd and Steve Woodward
Player of the match: Phil Simmons
14 March 1992
Scorecard
Australia 
265/6 (46 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
137 (41.4 overs)
Mark Waugh 66* (39)
John Traicos 1/30 (10 overs)
Eddo Brandes 23 (28)
Peter Taylor 2/14 (3.4 overs)
Australia won by 128 runs
Bellerive Oval, Hobart, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Steve Waugh
  • Rain stopped play with Australia 72/1 after 15 overs. Match reduced to 46 overs per side.
15 March 1992
Scorecard
England 
200/8 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
201/3 (40.5 overs)
Graeme Hick 56 (70)
Dipak Patel 2/26 (10 overs)
Andrew Jones 78 (113)
Ian Botham 1/19 (4 overs)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets[6]
Basin Reserve, Wellington, New Zealand
Umpires: Steve Randell and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Andrew Jones
15 March 1992
Scorecard
India 
180/6 (30 overs)
v
 South Africa
181/4 (29.1 overs)
Mohammad Azharuddin 79 (77)
Adrian Kuiper 2/28 (6 overs)
Peter Kirsten 84 (86)
Manoj Prabhakar 1/33 (5.1 overs)
South Africa won by 6 wickets
Adelaide Oval, Adelaide, Australia
Umpires: Dooland Buultjens and Khizer Hayat
Player of the match: Peter Kirsten
  • Rain reduced the match to 30 overs per side
15 March 1992
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
212/6 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
216/6 (49.1 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 43 (56)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/43 (10 overs)
Javed Miandad 57 (84)
Champaka Ramanayake 2/37 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 4 wickets
WACA Ground, Perth, Australia
Umpires: Karl Liebenberg and Peter McConnell
Player of the match: Javed Miandad
18 March 1992
Scorecard
New Zealand 
166 (48.2 overs)
v
 Pakistan
167/3 (44.4 overs)
Mark Greatbatch 42 (67)
Wasim Akram 4/32 (9.2 overs)
Rameez Raja 119* (155)
Danny Morrison 3/42 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets
Lancaster Park, Christchurch, New Zealand
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Mushtaq Ahmed

18 March 1992
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
134 (46.1 overs)
v
 England
125 (49.1 overs)
David Houghton 29 (74)
Ian Botham 3/23 (10 overs)
Alec Stewart 29 (96)
Eddo Brandes 4/21 (10 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 9 runs
Lavington Sports Oval, Albury, Australia
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Khizer Hayat
Player of the match: Eddo Brandes
18 March 1992
Scorecard
Australia 
216/6 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
159 (42.4 overs)
David Boon 100 (147)
Andy Cummins 3/38 (10 overs)
Brian Lara 70 (97)
Mike Whitney 4/34 (10 overs)
Australia won by 57 runs
Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
Umpires: Piloo Reporter and David Shepherd
Player of the match: David Boon

Knockout stage

Summary

In the first semi final, Pakistan defeated tournament favourites New Zealand in a high scoring encounter to win their first semi final in 4 attempts and book a place in the World Cup Final for the first time. Inzamam-ul-Haq smashed a 37 ball 60 in the run chase to achieve the target with one over remaining and also won the Man of the Match award.

In the second semi final between South Africa and England, the match ended in controversial circumstances when, after a 10-minute rain delay, the most productive overs method revised South Africa’s target from 22 runs from 13 balls to an impossible 21 runs from one ball. This rule was replaced for One-day International matches in Australia after the World Cup as a result of this incident, and it was eventually superseded by the Duckworth–Lewis method for the 1999 World Cup onwards. According to the late Bill Frindall, had the Duckworth–Lewis method been applied at that rain interruption, the revised target would have been four runs to tie or five to win from the final ball.[7] As a point of clarity, ESPN points out thatEngland’s innings was cut short when the overs weren’t completed by 6:10pm (the rescheduled close of innings time),[8]Cricinfo say that had Duckworth–Lewis been applied to the entire game, South Africa’s target from the original 45 overs would have been 273, which would then have been reduced to 257 from 43 overs, i.e. five runs more than they were set under the most productive overs rule.[9]

In a thrilling final, Pakistan beat England by 22 runs at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), allowing the “cornered tigers” captain Imran Khan to lift the trophy. Derek Pringle took two early wickets for England before Imran Khan and Javed Miandad added 139 for the third wicket to steady the Pakistan innings – although both were very slow to score early on, and Imran benefited from a dropped catch just as he was trying to increase the tempo, having up to that point scored only 9 in 16 overs. Late flourishes from Inzamam-ul-Haq (42 off 35 balls) and Wasim Akram (33 off 18 balls) took Pakistan to a total of 6 for 249. England also struggled early in their innings with Mushtaq Ahmed’s googly accounting for Graeme Hick.Neil Fairbrother and Allan Lamb then took England to 4 for 141 when Wasim Akram re-entered the attack and bowled from around the wicket. He bowled Lamb and Chris Lewis with consecutive deliveries. England fell 22 runs short with captainImran Khan, in his final One Day International, taking the final wicket of Richard Illingworth to give Pakistan its first World Cup title.

Bracket[edit]

Semi-finals Final
21 March – Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
 1  New Zealand 262/7
 4  Pakistan 264/6
25 March – Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
  Pakistan 249/6
  England 227
22 March – Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney, Australia
 2  England 252/6
 3  South Africa 232/6

Semi finals

21 March 1992
scorecard
New Zealand 
262/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
264/6 (49 overs)
Martin Crowe 91 (83 balls)
Wasim Akram 2/40 (10 overs)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/40 (10 overs)
Inzamam-ul-Haq 60 (37 balls)
Willie Watson 2/39 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 4 wickets
Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
Attendance: 46,000
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Inzamam-ul-Haq
22 March 1992
scorecard
England 
252/6 (45 overs)
v
 South Africa
232/6 (43 overs)
Graeme Hick 83 (90 balls)
Meyrick Pringle 2/36 (9 overs)
Andrew Hudson 46 (52 balls)
Richard Illingworth 2/46 (10 overs)
England won by 20 runs
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney, Australia
Attendance: 45,010
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Graeme Hick
  • Rain interrupted play before the last ball of the 43rd over. South Africa then required 22 runs off 13 balls for victory. With 2 overs lost due to rain, the target was reduced to 22 runs from only 1 ball.

Final

Main article: 1992 Cricket World Cup Final
25 March 1992
scorecard
Pakistan 
249/6 (50 overs)
v
 England
227 all out (49.2 overs)
Imran Khan 72 (110 balls)
Derek Pringle 3/22 (10 overs)
Neil Fairbrother 62 (70 balls)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/41 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 22 runs
Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Australia
Attendance: 87,182
Umpires: Brian Aldridge and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Wasim Akram

The MCG 87,182 people during the final

The final began with eerie resemblances to same fixture earlier in the tournament when England bowled out Pakistan for a paltry 74, as Derek Pringle dismissed both Pakistani openers at 24. However, Imran Khan and Javed Miandad settled down to see off the new ball. A crucial moment occurred when Imran Khan was dropped by Graham Gooch at 9 runs. He later went on to score a match-winning 72. At the 25 over mark, Pakistan had only scored 70, but accelerated the score to 139 by the 31st over as Javed Miandad summoned a runner and Imran and him built a steady partnership. During his innings, Imran Khan hit a huge six off Richard Illingworththat landed far back into the members section. Imran played a captain’s innings getting a score of 72 and Miandad 58 to steady the innings, expectedly followed by an onslaught from Inzamam(42) and Wasim Akram (33) enabling Pakistan to give England a fighting target of 250.

England’s start was shaky. Ian Botham was dismissed for a duck by Wasim Akram, followed by Stewart, Hick and Gooch, which left England tumbling at 69/4. A solid partnership of 71 between Allan Lamb and Neil Fairbrother left Imran with no choice but to give an early second spell to his main pacer Wasim Akram in the 35th over. The decision wrote the fate of the match. Two magical deliveries from the great left arm fast bowler showed Allan Lamb and the dangerous Chris Lewis the pavilion door. Soon Fairbrother was caught by Moin Khan off Aaqib Javed to seal England’s last hope. When the cards were laid down, Captain Imran Khan had the last laugh when Richard Illingworth was caught by Ramiz Raja off his delivery to finish off the final and crown Pakistan World Champions of cricket.

Statistics

Main article: 1992 Cricket World Cup statistics
Leading Run Scorers
Runs Player Matches
456 New Zealand Martin Crowe 9
437 Pakistan Javed Miandad 9
410 South Africa Peter Kirsten 8
368 Australia David Boon 8
349 Pakistan Rameez Raja 8
Leading Wicket Takers
Wickets Player Matches
18 Pakistan Wasim Akram 10
16 England Ian Botham 10
16 Pakistan Mushtaq Ahmed 9
16 New Zealand Chris Harris 9
14 Zimbabwe Eddo Brandes 8

Man of the Series

  • Martin Crowe, New Zealand[10]

Trivia

  • This was also the last time England had advanced to semi-finals (and finals) of a 50 over World Cup till World cup 2015.

Tactical Innovations

A notable feature of this World Cup was the innovative tactics employed by New Zealand captain Martin Crowe, who opened his team’s bowling with spin bowler Dipak Patel, rather than with a fast bowler as is usual practice. Another innovation was the then unorthodox ploy of opening the batting with “pinch hitters”, such as New Zealand’s Mark Greatbatch.[6][11] These innovations reversed the immediate prior form of New Zealand who realising they lacked a team of world-beaters, turned instead to craft; England had a clean sweep of their tour of New Zealand in 1991–92. Public expectations increased but were dashed in the semi-final as young Inzamam-ul-Haq pulled off victory for Pakistan while injured Martin Crowe watched from the stand.

1987 Cricket World Cup History

Format

The format of the competition was two groups of four teams each team playing each other twice in fifty-over matches. The top two teams from each group would advance to the semi-finals where the two winners would then advance to the final. All matches were played during daytime and – for a final time in the event’s history – saw the teams appear in traditional white clothing and use traditional red balls.

Qualification

See also: 1986 ICC Trophy

The ICC decreed that all seven (eligible) countries holding Test status would automatically qualify for the tournament; One additional entry place would be awarded to the winners of the 1986 ICC Trophy; and for the second time this turned out to be Zimbabwe, who defeated the Netherlands to earn the berth.

The following eight teams participated in the final tournament:

Group A

Main article: 1987 Cricket World Cup Group A
Team Pld W T L NRR Pts
 India 6 5 0 1 5.41 20
 Australia 6 5 0 1 5.19 20
 New Zealand 6 2 0 4 4.89 8
 Zimbabwe 6 0 0 6 3.76 0
9 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
270/6 (50 overs)
v
 India
269 (49.5 overs)
Australia won by 1 run
MA Chidambaram Stadium, Madras, India
10 October 1987
Scorecard
New Zealand 
242/7 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
239 (49.4 overs)
New Zealand won by 3 runs
Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium, Hyderabad, India
13 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
235/9 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
139 (49.4 overs)
Australia won by 96 runs
MA Chidambaram Stadium, Madras, India
14 October 1987
Scorecard
India 
252/7 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
236/8 (50 overs)
India won by 16 runs
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore, India
17 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
135 (44.2 overs)
v
 India
136/2 (27.5 overs)
India won by 8 wickets
Wankhede Stadium, Bombay, India
18 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
199/4 (30 overs)
v
 New Zealand
196/9 (30 overs)
Australia won by 3 runs
Nehru Stadium, Indore, India
22 October 1987
Scorecard
India 
289/6 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
233 (49 overs)
India won by 56 runs
Feroz Shah Kotla, Delhi, India
23 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
227/5 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
228/6 (47.4 overs)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets
Eden Gardens, Calcutta, India
26 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
191/7 (50 overs)
v
 India
194/3 (42 overs)
India won by 7 wickets
Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad, India
27 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
251/8 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
234 (48.4 overs)
Australia won by 17 runs
Sector 16 Stadium, Chandigarh, India
30 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
266/5 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
196/6 (50 overs)
Australia won by 70 runs
Barabati Stadium, Cuttack, India
31 October 1987
Scorecard
New Zealand 
221/9 (50 overs)
v
 India
224/1 (32.1 overs)
India won by 9 wickets
VCA Ground, Nagpur, India

Group B

Main article: 1987 Cricket World Cup Group B
Team Pld W T L NRR Pts
 Pakistan 6 5 0 1 5.01 20
 England 6 4 0 2 5.14 16
 West Indies 6 3 0 3 5.16 12
 Sri Lanka 6 0 0 6 4.04 0
8 October 1987
Scorecard
Pakistan 
267/6 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
252 (49.2 overs)
Pakistan won by 15 runs
Niaz Stadium, Hyderabad, Pakistan
9 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies 
243/7 (50 overs)
v
 England
246/8 (49.3 overs)
England won by 2 wickets
Municipal Stadium, Gujranwala, Pakistan
13 October 19871
Scorecard
Pakistan 
239/7 (50 overs)
v
 England
221 (48.4 overs)
Pakistan won by 18 runs
Pindi Club Ground, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
13 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies 
360/4 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
169/4 (50 overs)
West Indies won by 191 runs
National Stadium, Karachi, Pakistan
16 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies 
216 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
217/9 (50 overs)
Pakistan won by 1 wicket
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
17 October 1987
Scorecard
England 
296/4 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
158/8 (45 overs)2
England won by 108 runs
Arbab Niaz Stadium, Peshawar, Pakistan
20 October 1987
Scorecard
England 
244/9 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
247/3 (49 overs)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi, pakistan
21 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies 
236/8 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
211/8 (50 overs)
West Indies won by 25 runs
Green Park, Kanpur, India
25 October 1987
Scorecard
Pakistan 
297/7 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
184/8 (50 overs)
Pakistan won by 113 runs
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad, Pakistan
26 October 1987
Scorecard
England 
269/5 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
235 (48.1 overs)
England won by 34 runs
Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur, India
30 October 1987
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
218/7 (50 overs)
v
 England
219/2 (41.2 overs)
England won by 8 wickets
Nehru Stadium, Poona, India
30 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies 
258/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
230/9 (50 overs)
West Indies won by 28 runs
National Stadium, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Note 1: This match was scheduled for 12 October but abandoned without play due to rain. The reserve day was instead used.

  • Note 2: Rain interrupted the Sri Lankan innings; their target was reduced to 267 in 45 overs.

Knockout stage

Main article: 1987 Cricket World Cup knockout stage
Semi-finals Final
4 November – Lahore, Pakistan
  Australia 267/6
  Pakistan 249
8 November – Calcutta, India
  Australia 253/5
  England 246/8
5 November – Bombay, India
  England 254/6
  India 219

Semi-finals

Australia won the toss and chose to bat. The Australian batsmen got off to a very good start, and they scored fluently, withDavid Boon (65 from 91 balls, 4 fours) top scoring, and making an 82 run second-wicket partnership with DM Jones. Australia were looking to reach 300 with strong batting before Imran Khan took 3 wickets for 17 runs in 5 overs. Australia lost 4/31, but a high number of extras (34) from the Pakistani bowlers, as well as the solid batting from earlier on, brought Australia to 267 (8 wickets, 50 overs). Pakistan started badly, falling to 3/38. Imran Khan (58 from 84 balls, 4 fours) andJaved Miandad (70 from 103 balls, 4 fours) shared a partnership of 112 runs in 26 overs. However, with the required run rate at 7.87 runs when Miandad fell, there was just too much for the upcoming batsmen to do, and Pakistan lost 6/99 as they were bowled all out for 249 (all out, 49 overs)

India won the toss and chose to field. After reaching 2/79, Graham Gooch (115 from 136 balls, 11 fours) and captain Mike Gatting (56 from 62 balls, 5 fours) shared a partnership of 117 runs in 19 overs. After Gooch was finally stumped, 51 more runs were added, and England reached 254 (6 wickets, 50 overs). India made a bad start, falling to 3/73. The middle order scored fluently, with Mohammed Azharuddin, (64 from 74 balls, 7 fours) top scoring. Before Azharuddin was removed lbw by Eddie Hemmings, India were at 5/204, needing 5 runs an over from the last 10 overs, with 5 wickets in hand, and it looked like it would be a very close game. However, the middle and tailend order for India collapsed, as India lost 5/15. India were eventually bowled all out for 219 (all out, 45.3 overs), giving England both a berth in the final and a measure of revenge for the loss they suffered to India in the semifinal of the World Cup four years earlier in England.

4 November 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
267/6 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
249 (49.2 overs)
Australia won by 18 runs
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore, Pakistan
Attendance: 57,413
5 November 1987
Scorecard
England 
254/6 (50 overs)
v
 India
219 (45.3 overs)
England won by 35 runs
Wankhede Stadium, Bombay, India
Attendance: 45,000

Final

Main article: 1987 Cricket World Cup Final

Australia won the toss and chose to bat. David Boon (75 from 125 balls, 7 fours) top-scored for Australia, whose batsmen scored fluently. Australia posted 253 (5 wickets, 50 overs). Mike Veletta (45 from 31 balls, 6 fours) cut loose late in the innings, as Australia scored 65 runs from the last 6 overs of their innings. In the English reply, opener Tim Robinson was bowled for a first ball duck. Bill Athey (58 from 103 balls, 2 fours) top-scored, and England were almost on target,when captain Mike Gatting (41 from 45 balls, 3 fours, 1 six) handed back the initiative with the loss of his wicket, which ended a growing partnership of 69 runs in 13 overs between him and Athey. Allan Lamb (45 from 55 balls, 4 fours) also posted a great innings, but it was in vain as the required run-rate for England began to rise. When England failed to score the last 17 runs from the final over, the cup went to Australia.

8 November 1987
Scorecard
Australia 
253/5 (50 overs)
v
 England
246/8 (50 overs)
Australia won by 7 runs
Eden Gardens, Calcutta, India
Attendance: 95,000

Statistics

Main article: 1987 Cricket World Cup statistics
Leading run scorers
Runs Player Team Matches
471 Graham Gooch  England 8
447 David Boon  Australia 8
428 Geoff Marsh  Australia 8
391 Sir Viv Richards  West Indies 6
354 Mike Gatting  England 8
Leading wicket takers
Wickets Player Team Matches
18 Craig McDermott  Australia 8
17 Imran Khan  Pakistan 7
14 Patrick Patterson  West Indies 6
14 Maninder Singh  India 7
13 Eddie Hemmings  England 6

Records

  • The first hat-trick in Cricket World Cup history was taken by Chetan Sharma of India during their final group match against New Zealand. He clean bowled Ken Rutherford, Ian Smith and Ewen Chatfield with last three balls of the 42nd over.[2]
  • Navjot Singh Sidhu hit 9 sixes during the tournament – the highest number of sixes by a player during a single tournament.

Trivia

  • This World Cup was the last time an Asian team didn’t feature in the finals of a 50 over World Cup.

1983 Cricket World Cup History

Format

The format of the 1983 World Cup was 2 groups of four teams, each team playing each other twice. The top two teams from each group then advanced to the semi finals with the winners further advancing to the finals. Every game was of 60 overs with all day matches.

Participants

The following 8 teams qualified for the final tournament (7 full ICC members including recently appointed full member Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe who qualified by winning the 1982 ICC Trophy).

Group A Group B
 England  West Indies
 Pakistan  India
 New Zealand  Australia
 Sri Lanka  Zimbabwe

Group A

Main article: 1983 Cricket World Cup Group A
Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 England 20 6 5 1 0 4.671
 Pakistan 12 6 3 3 0 4.014
 New Zealand 12 6 3 3 0 3.927
 Sri Lanka 4 6 1 5 0 3.752
9 June 1983
Scorecard
England 
322/6 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
216 (59 overs)
 England won by 106 runs
The Oval, London, England
9 June 1983
Scorecard
Pakistan 
338/5 (60 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
288/9 (60 overs)
 Pakistan won by 50 runs
St Helen’s, Swansea, Wales
11 June 1983
Scorecard
England 
333/9 (60 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
286 (58 overs)
 England won by 47 runs
County Ground, Taunton, England
11 June 1983
Scorecard
New Zealand 
238/9 (60 overs)
v
 Pakistan
186 (55.2 overs)
 New Zealand won by 52 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
13 June 1983
Scorecard
Pakistan 
193/8 (60 overs)
v
 England
199/2 (50.4 overs)
 England won by 8 wickets
Lord’s, London, England
13 June 1983
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
206 (56.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
209/5 (39.2 overs)
 New Zealand won by 5 wickets
County Ground, Bristol, England
15 June 1983
Scorecard
England 
234 (55.2 overs)
v
 New Zealand
238/8 (59.5 overs)
 New Zealand won by 2 wickets
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
16 June 1983
Scorecard
Pakistan 
235/7 (60 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
224 (58.3 overs)
 Pakistan won by 11 runs
Headingley, Leeds, England
18 June 1983
Scorecard
Pakistan 
232/8 (60 overs)
v
 England
233/3 (57.2 overs)
 England won by 7 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
18 June 1983
Scorecard
New Zealand 
181 (58.2 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
184/7 (52.5 overs)
 Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets
County Ground, Derby, England
20 June 1983
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
136 (50.4 overs)
v
 England
137/1 (24.1 overs)
 England won by 9 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
20 June 1983
Scorecard
Pakistan 
261/3 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
250 (59.1 overs)
 Pakistan won by 11 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England

Group B

Main article: 1983 Cricket World Cup Group B
Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 West Indies 20 6 5 1 0 4.308
 India 16 6 4 2 0 3.870
 Australia 8 6 2 4 0 3.808
 Zimbabwe 4 6 1 5 0 3.492
9 June 1983
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
239/6 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
226/7 (60 overs)
 Zimbabwe won by 13 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
9 June 1983
Scorecard
India 
262/8 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
228 (54.1 overs)
 India won by 34 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
11 June 1983
Scorecard
West Indies 
252/9 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
151 (30.3 overs)
 West Indies won by 101 runs
Headingley, Leeds, England
11 June 1983
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
155 (51.4 overs)
v
 India
157/5 (37.3 overs)
 India won by 5 wickets
Grace Road, Leicester, England
13 June 1983
Scorecard
Australia 
320/9 (60 overs)
v
 India
158 (37.5 overs)
 Australia won by 162 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
13 June 1983
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
217/7 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
218/2 (48.3 overs)
 West Indies won by 8 wickets
New Road, Worcester, England
15 June 1983
Scorecard
West Indies 
282/9 (60 overs)
v
 India
216 (53.1 overs)
 West Indies won by 66 runs
The Oval, London, England
16 June 1983
Scorecard
Australia 
272/7 (60 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
240 (59.5 overs)
 Australia won by 32 runs
County Ground, Southampton, England
18 June 1983
Scorecard
Australia 
273/6 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
276/3 (57.5 overs)
 West Indies won by 7 wickets
Lord’s, London, England
18 June 1983
Scorecard
India 
266/8 (60 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
235 (57 overs)
 India won by 31 runs
Nevill Ground, Royal Tunbridge Wells, England
20 June 1983
Scorecard
India 
247 (55.5 overs)
v
 Australia
129 (38.2 overs)
 India won by 118 runs
County Ground, Chelmsford, England
20 June 1983
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
171 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
172/0 (45.1 overs)
 West Indies won by 10 wickets
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England

Knockout stage

Main article: 1983 Cricket World Cup knockout stage
Semi-finals Final
22 June – Old Trafford, Manchester
  England 213
  India 217/4
25 June – Lord’s, London
  India 183
  West Indies 140
22 June – The Oval, London
  Pakistan 184/8
  West Indies 188/2

Semi-finals

22 June 1983
scorecard
England 
213 (60 overs)
v
 India
217/4 (54.4 overs)
 India won by 6 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester,
Attendance: 19,961

In the first semi-final, at Old Trafford on 22 June, England won the toss and batted first. The English batsmen mistimed many balls and used the bat’s edge frequently, as the restrictive Indian bowling led England to score 213 (all out, 60 overs).Graeme Fowler (33 from 59 balls, 3 fours) top scored, and Kapil Dev took 3 for 35 in eleven overs, with Mohinder Amarnathand Roger Binny taking two wickets each. In reply, Yashpal Sharma (61 from 115 balls, 3 fours, 2 sixes) and Sandeep Patil(51 from 32 balls, 8 fours) made half-centuries, as India reached their target in 54.4 overs, winning by 6 wickets in a classic victory over the previous tournament’s runner-ups. Mohinder Amarnath (46 from 92 balls, 4 fours, 1 six) picked up the man-of-the-match award for his all round performance, which saw him add 46 runs to his earlier bowling success (2/27 in 12 overs).[1]

22 June 1983
scorecard
Pakistan 
184/8 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
188/2 (48.4 overs)
 West Indies won by 8 wickets
The Oval, London,
Attendance: 20,054

The second semi-final, between Pakistan and the West Indies, was staged at The Oval on the same day. West Indies won the toss and inserted Pakistan, whom they restricted to just 184 (8 wickets, 60 overs). Mohsin Khan (70 from 176 balls, 1 four) fought his way past 50 against the superb West Indies Bowling (he was the only Pakistani batsman to reach 50).Malcolm Marshall (3-28) and Andy Roberts (2-25) starred with the ball. The West Indies innings was based around a superb innings by Viv Richards (80 from 96 balls, 11 fours, 1 six), who took the man-of-the-match award, and an unbeaten half-century by Larry Gomes (50 from 100 balls, 3 fours) as the defending champions reached their target for the loss of just two wickets.[2]

Final

Main article: 1983 Cricket World Cup Final
25 June 1983
scorecard
India 
183 (54.4 overs)
v
 West Indies
140 (52 overs)
 India won by 43 runs
Lord’s, London,
Attendance: 30,000

In the final, India lost the toss and were asked to bat first against a West Indies team that arguably boasted the world’s best bowling attack[citation needed]. Only Krishnamachari Srikkanth (38 from 57 balls) and Mohinder Amarnath (26 from 80 balls) put up any significant resistance as Roberts, Marshall, Joel Garner and Michael Holding ripped through the Indian batsmen, ably supported by Gomes. Surprising resistance by the tail allowed India to compile 183 (all out, 54.4 overs).When Indian chips were down Kapil Dev said “Team if this is not a winning total its definitely a fighting total” One of the popular quotes of all time. However, the Indian bowling exploited the weather and pitch conditions perfectly to bowl out the best batting lineup of the era for 140 from 52 overs in return, winning by 43 runs and completing one of the most stunning upsets in cricket history. Amarnath and Madan Lal (3-31) each took three wickets, and one memorable moment was the sight of Kapil Devrunning a great distance (about 18-20 yards) to take a catch to dismiss Richards, the West Indies top scorer with 33 from 28 balls. Amarnath was the most economical bowler, conceding just 12 runs from his seven overs while taking 3 wickets, and was once again awarded the Man of the Match award for his all-round performance.[3] There was no ‘Man of the Series’ awarded in 1983.

1979 Cricket World Cup History

Format

The format of the 1979 world cup was 2 groups of four teams, each team playing each other. The top two team from each group then advance to the Semi Finals where the winners then advance to the finals.

Participants

The following 8 teams qualified for the final tournament. Sri Lanka and Canada were the only two teams without Test statusand qualified for the tournament by reaching the final of the 1979 ICC Trophy.[1] East Africa who played in the first World cup didn’t qualify this time, which meant that there would be no nation from the African region participating in the 1979 World Cup.

Group A

Main article: 1979 Cricket World Cup Group A
Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 England 12 3 3 0 0 3.07
 Pakistan 8 3 2 1 0 3.60
 Australia 4 3 1 2 0 3.16
 Canada 0 3 0 3 0 1.60
9 June 1979
Scorecard
Australia 
159/9 (60 overs)
v
 England
160/4 (47.1 overs)
 England won by 6 wickets
Lord’s, London, England
9 June 1979
Scorecard
Canada 
139/9 (60 overs)
v
 Pakistan
140/2 (40.1 overs)
 Pakistan won by 8 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
14 June 1979
Scorecard
Pakistan 
286/7 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
197 all out (57.1 overs)
 Pakistan won by 89 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
14 June 1979
Scorecard
Canada 
45 all out (40.3 overs)
v
 England
46/2 (13.5 overs)
 England won by 8 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
16 June 1979
Scorecard
Canada 
105 all out (33.2 overs)
v
 Australia
106/3 (26 overs)
 Australia won by 7 wickets
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
16 June 1979
Scorecard
England 
165/9 (60 overs)
v
 Pakistan
151 all out (56 overs)
 England won by 14 runs
Headingley, Leeds, England

Group B

Main article: 1979 Cricket World Cup Group B
Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 West Indies 10 3 2 0 1 3.93
 New Zealand 8 3 2 1 0 3.55
 Sri Lanka 6 3 1 1 1 3.56
 India 0 3 0 3 0 3.13
9 June 1979
Scorecard
India 
190 all out (53.1 overs)
v
 West Indies
194/1 (51.3 overs)
 West Indies won by 9 wickets
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
9 June 1979
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
189 all out (56.5 overs)
v
 New Zealand
190/1 (47.4 overs)
 New Zealand won by 9 wickets
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
13, 14, 15 June 1979
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
v
 West Indies
No result
The Oval, London, England
13 June 1979
Scorecard
India 
182 all out (55.5 overs)
v
 New Zealand
183/2 (57 overs)
 New Zealand won by 8 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
18 June 1979
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
238/5 (60 overs)
v
 India
191 all out (54.1 overs)
 Sri Lanka won by 47 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
16 June 1979
Scorecard
West Indies 
244/7 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
212/9 (60 overs)
 West Indies won by 32 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England

Knockout stage

Main article: 1979 Cricket World Cup knockout stage
Semi-finals Final
20 June – Old Trafford, Manchester
  England 221/8
  New Zealand 212/9
23 June – Lord’s, London
  England 194
  West Indies 286/9
20 June – The Oval, London
  West Indies 293/6
  Pakistan 250

Semi-finals 

In a very close semifinal match, England prevailed. New Zealand won the toss and fielded. England began badly, falling to 38/2, before Mike Brearley (53 from 115 balls, 3 fours) and Graham Gooch (71 from 84 balls, 1 four, 3 sixes) resurrected the innings. Derek Randall (42 from 50 balls, 1 four, 1 six) played well in the second half of the innings, as England recovered from 98/4 to post 221 (8 wickets, 60 overs). In the response, John Wright (69 from 137 balls) attacked well in the beginning. However, the loss of wickets bogged New Zealand down, and despite several late flourishes in the batting order, New Zealand started to drop behind. When New Zealand could not achieve the remaining 14 runs from the last over of the match, England went into the final.

Gordon Greenidge (73 from 107 balls, 5 fours, 1 six) and Desmond Haynes (65 from 115 balls, 4 fours) set a first wicket partnership of 132 runs in a match dominated by batting. Vivian Richards and Clive Lloyd also contributed solidly, as West Indies ran up 293 (6 wickets, 60 overs) against Pakistan. Majid Khan (81 from 124 balls, 7 fours) and Zaheer Abbas (93 from 122 balls) shared a second-wicket partnership of 166 runs in 36 overs in the response. However, none of the other Pakistani batsmen flourished, with Javed Miandad being bowled for a duck first ball, and Pakistan lost 9/74, beginning with the dismissal of Abbas. Pakistan was bowled all out for 250 (all out, 56.2 overs) in the high-scoring semifinal, sending the West Indies to the final.

20 June 1979
Scorecard
West Indies 
293/6 (60 overs)
v
 Pakistan
250 all out (56.2 overs)
 West Indies won by 43 runs
The Oval, London, England
20 June 1979
Scorecard
England 
221/8 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
212/9 (60 overs)
 England won by 9 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester, England

Final

Main article: 1979 Cricket World Cup Final

England won the toss and chose to field first. The West Indies got off to a bad start, falling to 99/4 with the loss of Greenidge, Haynes, Kallicharan, and captain Clive Lloyd. However, Vivian Richards (138 from 157 balls, 11 fours, 3 sixes) and Collis King (86 from 66 balls, 10 fours, 3 sixes) consolidated the innings. King especially ripped through the English bowling, with a strike rate of 130.3. The West Indies were already at 238/5 when the 139 run partnership ended with the loss of Collis King. Vivian Richards and the tail then took the West Indies to a very imposing total of 286 (9 wickets, 60 overs).

The English batsmen got off to a good start. But the openers, Mike Brearley (64 from 130 balls, 7 fours) and Geoff Boycott(57 from 105 balls, 3 fours) scored very slowly. They put together a very methodical opening partnership of 129 runs in 38 overs, playing as if the match were a five-day Test. By the time both batsmen were out, the required run rate had risen too high. Graham Gooch played some hefty strokes in scoring his 32, taking England to 183/2. However, the loss of Gooch triggered the most devastating collapse in World Cup history, as England lost 8/11. They were eventually all out for 194 in 51 overs. Vivian Richards was declared Man of the Match.

23 June 1979
Scorecard
West Indies 
286/9 (60 overs)
v
 England
194 all out (51 overs)
 West Indies won by 92 runs
Lord’s, London, England
Attendance: 32,000

1975 Cricket World Cup History

Format

The format of the first world cup was 2 groups of four teams each, and each team playing each other. The top two team from each group then advance to the Semi Finals where the winners then advance (qualified) to the finals.

The first Cricket World Cup was played in England on seven different venues. A total of 16 matches were played in the 1975 Cricket World Cup including 2 Semifinals and a Final match.[1]

Participants

England hosted the each of the first three competitions. The ICC decided that England should host the first tournament because it was ready to put the resources needed in organising the inaugural event. India proposed that it should host the third Cricket World Cup, but most ICC members believed England was a more suitable venue because longer period of daylight in June. This meant that a match could be completed in one day.[2]

The following 8 teams qualified for the final tournament. Sri Lanka and East Africa were the only two teams without Test status.

Group A

Main article: 1975 Cricket World Cup Group A

Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 England 12 3 3 0 0 4.94
 New Zealand 8 3 2 1 0 4.07
 India 4 3 1 2 0 3.24
East Africa 0 3 0 3 0 1.90
7 June 1975
Scorecard
 England
334/4 (60 overs)
v
 India
132/3 (60 overs)
England won by 202 runs
Lord’s, London, England
7 June 1975
Scorecard
 New Zealand
309/5 (60 overs)
v
East Africa
128/8 (60 overs)
New Zealand won by 181 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
11 June 1975
Scorecard
 England
266/6 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
186 (60 overs)
England won by 80 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England
11 June 1975
Scorecard
East Africa
120 (55.3 overs)
v
 India
123/0 (29.5 overs)
India won by 10 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
14 June 1975
Scorecard
 England
290 (60 overs)
v
East Africa
94 (52.3 overs)
England won by 196 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
14 June 1975
Scorecard
 India
230 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
233/6 (58.5 overs)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England

Group B

Main article: 1975 Cricket World Cup Group B

Team Pts Pld W L NR RR
 West Indies 12 3 3 0 0 4.35
 Australia 8 3 2 1 0 4.43
 Pakistan 4 3 1 2 0 4.45
 Sri Lanka 0 3 0 3 0 2.78
7 June 1975
Scorecard
 Australia
278/7 (60 overs)
v
 Pakistan
205 (53 overs)
Australia won by 73 runs
Headingley, Leeds, England
7 June 1975
Scorecard
 Sri Lanka
86 (37.2 overs)
v
 West Indies
87/1 (20.4 overs)
West Indies won by 9 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester, England
11 June 1975
Scorecard
 Australia
328/5 (60 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
276/4 (60 overs)
Australia won by 52 runs
Kennington Oval, London, England
11 June 1975
Scorecard
 Pakistan
266/7 (60 overs)
v
 West Indies
267/9 (59.4 overs)
West Indies won by 1 wicket
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
14 June 1975
Scorecard
 Australia
192 (53.4 overs)
v
 West Indies
195/3 (46 overs)
West Indies won by 7 wicket
Kennington Oval, London, England
14 June 1975
Scorecard
 Pakistan
330/6 (60 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
138 (50.1 overs)
Pakistan won by 192 runs
Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England

Knockout stage

Main article: 1975 Cricket World Cup knockout stage
Semi-finals Final
18 June – Leeds
  England 93
  Australia 94/6
21 June – London
  Australia 274
  West Indies 291/8
18 June – London
  New Zealand 158
  West Indies 159/5

Semifinals

In the best World Cup performance to date by a bowler, Gary Gilmour took six for fourteen as England were bowled out for 93 (36.2 overs), after having fallen to 37/7. Australia initially suffered a collapse just as dramatic, falling to 39/6, before Gilmour (28 from 28 balls, 5 fours) brought them home in a fantastic all-round performance.

The West Indies won the toss and sent New Zealand in to bat first. New Zealand batted well against the bowling at first, reaching 98/1. However, when captain Glenn Turner (36 from 74 balls, 3 fours) and Geoff Howarth (51 from 93 balls, 3 fours) fell, breaking a second-wicket partnership of 90 runs, New Zealand lost 9/60 to fall to 158 (all out, 52.2 overs). The West Indies responded, with Alvin Kallicharan (72 from 92 balls, 7 fours, 1 six) and Gordon Greenidge (55 from 95 balls, 9 fours, 1 six) sharing a second-wicket partnership of 125 runs that brought the West Indies to their target.

18 June 1975
Scorecard
 England
93 (36.2 overs)
v
 Australia
94/6 (28.4 overs)
Australia won by 4 wickets
Headingley, Leeds, England
18 June 1975
Scorecard
 New Zealand
158 (52.2 overs)
v
 West Indies
159/5 (40.1 overs)
West Indies won by 5 wickets
Kennington Oval, London, England

Final

Main article: 1975 Cricket World Cup Final

In the final, the West Indies beat Australia by 17 runs, after an accomplished innings from captain Clive Lloyd (102 from 85 balls, 12 fours, 2 sixes). The Australian innings was marked by top-order batsmen being run out when going for runs after misfields. A total of five of their team were run out, three by Vivian Richards. There was no ‘Man of the Series’ awarded in 1975.

21 June 1975
Scorecard
 West Indies
291/8 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
274 (58.4 overs)
West Indies won by 17 runs
Lord’s, London, England
Attendance: 24,000